Compostable tableware at the Curve!

Keep an eye out at the Curve in September for the launch of their brand new Palm Leaf tableware!

palmleaf

Entirely made from Areca nut palm leaves, the tableware is free from chemicals and can be used in the microwave and freezer. By using this tableware, rather than the chinaware in the Curve previously, the Curve can save some valuable money, time and water that was previously spent washing up throughout the day.

So how are they made??

Fallen Areca nut palm leaves are gathered in the forests of Kerala, Southern India before being soaked in spring water, heat pressed into shape and then dried.

Are they really sustainable?

The leaves used have already fallen from the trees and are therefore completely sustainable and easily renewed. In addition, producing this tableware  provides work for social enterprises in rural India – most of the production units are small ‘micro’ farms and are often family run too.

Can the plates be reused?

Yes! The plates and bowls are sturdier than you think so please do feel free to take them home with you to reuse if you’d like! Just don’t forget to stick them in the compost when you’re done.

What about the cutlery?

The cutlery is also completely compostable. It is the world’s first cutlery ranfe made entirely from recycled PLA and has 90% less embodied carbon than plastic, and 51% less carbon than new PLA.

 

 

So, what do you think of the new tableware at the Curve? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below.

 

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3 Comments Add yours

  1. Ed Oliver says:

    sounds a great idea!

    Like

    1. Michelle says:

      Hi Sustainability – I’m curious are these being composted on campus? or collected as food waste by the council?

      Like

  2. Oscar says:

    Hello QMUL Sustainability, saving valuable money, time and water is surely a very worthy cause. I not sure, however, whether having one-way table wear is really a greener alternative. Recent life-cycle assessments of using compostable plates and cutlery at university canteens seem to suggest otherwise. Has this been done at QMUL?

    Like

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